We Owe What Episodes

Raising Financially Savvy Children

Tags: We Owe What

Jim Rogers is a legendary Wall Street investor who success allowed him to retire at 37 years old. Now at 69-years old he is enjoying a new vocation -- full-time dad. His two girls, age 9 and 4, have inspired him to write a book to share his money and life lessons. He shared those lessons with Live Well Network's Mary Caraccioli.

We asked what rich dad secrets he has to raising financially savvy children. Here are his top tips:

1) Give your child an allowance IF you tie that allowance to chores. Rogers says children need to learn early they have to work for their money. The earlier they get that lesson the better.

2) Teens should have part-time jobs. Rogers believes the best way to prepare a young person for the real world is to show them a map of how things work.

3) Talk to your kids about money -- even if you've made mistakes. Rogers says mistakes are part of learning. No one -- even this icon is immune. Understanding money is a mandatory tool for success. By avoiding money talks with your kids you are doing them a disservice. Get the conversation started and as they get older don't be afraid to share your own missteps.

4) Have your child learn a second language. Rogers has his children learning Mandarin Chinese because of the promise of doing business with China. But he says Spanish and Portuguese are good choices, too.

5) Don't let anyone else do your homework. Knowing your stuff not only helps you make better investment choices -- but he says it will protect you from being taken advantage of. You work hard for your money -- don't take short cuts when it comes to how you invest it.

blog comments powered by Disqus
The Live Well Network
Knock It Off!
Mirror/Mirror
Live Big with Ali Vincent
Motion
My Family Recipe Rocks!
Food Rush
Sweet Retreats
We Owe What?
Let's Dish
Deals
Mexico: One Plate at a Time
Home with Lisa Quinn
Steven and Chris
Best Recipes Ever
Good Cookin' with Bruce Aidells
Laura McKenzie's Traveler
Children's Programming