Knock It Off! Episodes

How to Make Slip Cover for Bean Bag Chair

Need some inexpensive moveable seating for guests when you entertain? Here's an easy solution: slipcovers for cheap beanbag chairs. Buy them during back-to-college sales and cover them with fabric that matches your decor.

Bean bag chairs can be an awesome way to add additional flex seating to a room. Unfortunately, the cute patterned ones always cost a ton! We purchased inexpensive (and ugly) bean bag chairs and made our own fun, slipcovers using awesome fabric from the clearance aisle.

To make your slipcovers extra durable, consider using a serger rather than a sewing machine. If you're using a sewing machine, make sure to carefully measure your seam allowances, making them even on all sides of the fabric, so that the pieces fit together.

Here's what you'll need:

  • bean bag chair
  • home decor weight fabric
  • sewing machine or serger
  • fabric scissors
  • velcro (optional)
  • thread
1. Measure your bean bags and determine the length and width of each side and the top and bottom. Add an inch to each of your measurments for looseness and seam allowances You'll need to cut a rectangle of fabric for four sides, and two squares - one for the top and one bottom piece.

2. Mark your side panels 1,2,3 and 4. With right sides together, sew the side of panel 1 to the side of panel 2 with a half inch seam allowance. Repeat this, sewing panel 3 to panel 2, and then panel 4 to panel 3. You should have a long line of panels that would wrap around your bean bag chair (don't sew them in a circle just yet).

3. With right sides together, sew one side of the top panel to one open side of panel 2. Repeat with bottom panel on the opposite open side of panel 2.

3. Repeat this process, sewing the top and bottom panel to panel 3 and then panel 4.

4. Then, sew the bottom panel to the bottom of panel 4.

5. Turn the slipcover inside out and insert your bean bag.

6. To make the slipcover removable, cut a strip of velcro the length of the remaining seam. Sew the velcro to the inside of the top panel, folding the edge of the fabric over just slightlyto make a clean hem. Sew the other side of the fabric to the remaining open side panel. Connect the velcro to close your slipcover.

7. To make a non-removable slip cover, fold the edges of the seams in and hand stitch the seam closed.

Rec Room to Home Movie Theater

Other segments featured on this episode of Knock It Off!:

Designers Create Plan for Budget-Friendly Media Room
Designers Create Plan for Budget-Friendly Media Room
Design experts Monica and Jess meet with homeowners Jess and Baron to talk about their vision for a home movie theater where they can entertain friends during movie marathons and spend time with their three daughters.
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DIY Cornice Boards and Theater Curtains
DIY Cornice Boards and Theater Curtains
Custom cornice boards and expensive theater-style curtains can costs hundreds, but here's a how you can DIY them for practically nothing with inexpensive MDF, fabric and a few power tools.
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DIY Home Concession Stand
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No movie theater would be complete without popcorn and candy. Here's how to create your own DIY concession stand at home, complete with a popcorn maker, a mini fridge and more!
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DIY Upholstered Ottoman from Thrift Store Coffee Table
Want an expensive upholstered ottoman for your living room without the high price tag? Heres how to DIY it using an old thrift store coffee table. This entire easy DIY project costs less than $90.
Want an expensive upholstered ottoman for your living room without the high price tag? Here's how to DIY it using an old thrift store coffee table. This entire easy DIY project costs less than $90.
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